Pilot Officer Brian Nordon

I had this comment a few minutes ago.

The father of my wife was in 238 squadron, Brian Nordon. I have many photos he took if you are interested. I’ve just this evening been looking through his numerous maps, this is what brought me here.

There is very little information about Pilot Officer B. Nordon on the Internet. This is what I could find…

http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/italy_filippi.htm

At the beginning of 1942, the 23o Gruppo joined the 18o Gruppo to establish the 3o Stormo again. The units reassembled at Mirafori to be re-equipped with Macchi MC.202s.

The unit returned to North Africa and took part of the Axis offensive into Egypt during the summer and fall of 1942.

The first operation to be undertaken by newly-arrived 23o Gruppo occurred when Maggiore Luigi Filippi, the unit commander, led twelve MC.202s (seven of the 75 and five of the 74a Squadriglie) on a free sweep (17:20-18:40) over the lines on 17 July. North of El Alamein fighters were seen, Filippi claiming one and Sergente Maggiore Felice Papini (74a Squadriglia) a probable, identified as P-40s.

At about the same time (17:30-19:00) Capitano Carlo Ruspoli led 14 more Macchis, this time of the 10o Gruppo to escort a formation of Ju 88s to this area. North of El Alamein a reported ten Hurricanes and eight Spitfires attacked the bombers but were engaged by the escorting pilots, Capitano Ruspoli claiming one of the Hurricanes.

Hurricanes from 80 and 238 Squadrons were patrolling in the area between 18:40-19:30, spotting 15 Ju 87s with eight escorting Bf 109s of III./JG 27 and the MC.202s. The escorts were indeed successful in preventing the Hurricanes getting at the bombers, Leutnant Werener Schroer of 8./JG 27 claiming one shot down west of El Alamein at 18:25.

Pilot Officer B. Nordon from 238 (Hurricane IIb ‘V’) claimed a damaged but the unit lost two Hurricanes when the commanding officer, 22-year-old Squadron Leader Richard George Arthur Barclay, DFC (RAF no. 74661), was shot down and killed in Hurricane IIb BP296/U (reportedly by a Bf 109); Barclay had claimed six confirmed victories prior to his demise, four over England in 1940 and two since arriving in the desert. The second Hurricane (‘J’) was reportedly shot down by two MC.202 and crash-landed with Pilot Officer E. M. Frost severely wounded.

Footnote

About Squadron Leader Barclay

barclayrga-portrait1-opt

http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Barclay.htm

Richard George Arthur Barclay was born at Upper Norwood, Surrey on 7th December 1919 and grew up at the rectory at Great Holland, near Frinton-on-Sea, Essex, where his father, the Rev GA Barclay, was the incumbent until 1939, when he moved to the living at Cromer, Norfolk.

They were related to the banking family. CT Studd, maternal grandfather of RGA Barclay, had played cricket for Middlesex and England.

He was educated at Stowe School and then went to Trinity College, Cambridge to read Economics and Law.

In 1938 he joined the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in June 1939.

Called up in October, Barclay went to 3 ITW Hastings on 8th November 1939. He began his RAF flying training at Cranwell on 1st January 1940 and with this completed he was then posted to No. 1 School of Army Co-operation on 2nd June.

Eight days later he moved to 5 OTU Aston Down to convert to Hurricanes and on 23rd June he joined 249 Squadron at Leconfield.

On 2nd September 1940 Barclay damaged a Me110, on the 7th he shot down a Me109 and damaged a Do17 and a He111, on the 15th he shot down a Do17, probably destroyed two others and damaged a fourth, on the 18th probably destroyed a He111, on the 19th shared a Ju88 and on the 27th claimed a Me109 and a Ju88 destroyed.

During the attack on Ju88’s on that day, Barclay, in Hurricane V6622, was shot down south of London and made a forced-landing at West Malling. He got a probable Me109 on 15th October, two probable Me109’s on 7th November and shared another on the 14th.

He was awarded the DFC (gazetted 26th November 1940).

On 29th November 1940 Barclay was shot down by a Me109 and wounded in the ankle, legs and elbow. He spent two months in hospital and did not return to 249 until March 1941.

In describing the events of 29th November he wrote that he had landed in an apple orchard and ‘…the usual crowd came running up and put me in a car. I was taken to Pembury Hospital [near Tunbridge Wells] in high spirits and very excited. Nasty hole in ankle whence came nose of cannon shell..’.

He was operated on that evening.

He was posted to 52 OTU Debden as an instructor on 7th May. Three months later he joined 611 Squadron at Hornchurch as a Flight Commander.

During a sweep over St Omer on 20th September 1941, Barclay was attacked by Me109’s and his engine damaged. He forced-landed at Buyschoeure after breaking high tension cables. With the help of the French Resistance he crossed the Spanish Frontier, arriving in Barcelona on 7th November. He reached the British Embassy, left for Gibraltar on 7th December and arrived back in the UK two days later.

After a short attachment to HQ Fighter Command, Barclay was posted to HQ 9 Group as Tactics Officer. On 4th April 1942 he was given command of 601 Squadron, then about to go to the Middle East. The squadron embarked at Liverpool on 10th April in HMT K6 (SS Rangitata) and reached Port Tewfik on 4th June, having gone via South Africa and Aden.

Barclay did not get a chance to lead 601. He went to command 238 Squadron at Amriya from 2nd July 1942.

On the 16th he shot down a Me109. In the afternoon of 17th July he destroyed a Ju87.

In the early evening he led 238 on a patrol of the Alamein area acting as top cover for 274 Squadron. As 238 moved to attack some Ju87’s it was jumped by Me109’s and Barclay was shot down and killed, possibly by Leutnant Werner Schroer of III/JG27.

Barclay is buried in the El Alamein Cemetery and he is commemorated on a plaque in Cromer Parish Church, where his father was vicar from 1939 to 1946.

Barclay’s elder brother, Lieutenant GC Barclay, died on 5th May 1944 serving with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Norfolk Regiment. He is buried in Kohima War Cemetery, India.

7 thoughts on “Pilot Officer Brian Nordon

  1. Richard George Arthur Barclay was born at Upper Norwood, Surrey on 7th December 1919 and grew up at the rectory at Great Holland, near Frinton-on-Sea, Essex, where his father, the Rev GA Barclay, was the incumbent until 1939, when he moved to the living at Cromer, Norfolk.

    They were related to the banking family. CT Studd, maternal grandfather of RGA Barclay, had played cricket for Middlesex and England.

    He was educated at Stowe School and then went to Trinity College, Cambridge to read Economics and Law.

    In 1938 he joined the University Air Squadron and was commissioned in the RAFVR in June 1939.

    Called up in October, Barclay went to 3 ITW Hastings on 8th November 1939. He began his RAF flying training at Cranwell on 1st January 1940 and with this completed he was then posted to No. 1 School of Army Co-operation on 2nd June.

    Eight days later he moved to 5 OTU Aston Down to convert to Hurricanes and on 23rd June he joined 249 Squadron at Leconfield.

    On 2nd September 1940 Barclay damaged a Me110, on the 7th he shot down a Me109 and damaged a Do17 and a He111, on the 15th he shot down a Do17, probably destroyed two others and damaged a fourth, on the 18th probably destroyed a He111, on the 19th shared a Ju88 and on the 27th claimed a Me109 and a Ju88 destroyed.

     

     

    During the attack on Ju88’s on that day, Barclay, in Hurricane V6622, was shot down south of London and made a forced-landing at West Malling. He got a probable Me109 on 15th October, two probable Me109’s on 7th November and shared another on the 14th.

    He was awarded the DFC (gazetted 26th November 1940).

    On 29th November 1940 Barclay was shot down by a Me109 and wounded in the ankle, legs and elbow. He spent two months in hospital and did not return to 249 until March 1941.

    In describing the events of 29th November he wrote that he had landed in an apple orchard and ‘…the usual crowd came running up and put me in a car. I was taken to Pembury Hospital [near Tunbridge Wells] in high spirits and very excited. Nasty hole in ankle whence came nose of cannon shell..’.

    He was operated on that evening.

    He was posted to 52 OTU Debden as an instructor on 7th May. Three months later he joined 611 Squadron at Hornchurch as a Flight Commander.

    During a sweep over St Omer on 20th September 1941, Barclay was attacked by Me109’s and his engine damaged. He forced-landed at Buyschoeure after breaking high tension cables. With the help of the French Resistance he crossed the Spanish Frontier, arriving in Barcelona on 7th November. He reached the British Embassy, left for Gibraltar on 7th December and arrived back in the UK two days later.

    After a short attachment to HQ Fighter Command, Barclay was posted to HQ 9 Group as Tactics Officer. On 4th April 1942 he was given command of 601 Squadron, then about to go to the Middle East. The squadron embarked at Liverpool on 10th April in HMT K6 (SS Rangitata) and reached Port Tewfik on 4th June, having gone via South Africa and Aden.

    Barclay did not get a chance to lead 601. He went to command 238 Squadron at Amriya from 2nd July 1942.

    On the 16th he shot down a Me109. In the afternoon of 17th July he destroyed a Ju87.

    In the early evening he led 238 on a patrol of the Alamein area acting as top cover for 274 Squadron. As 238 moved to attack some Ju87’s it was jumped by Me109’s and Barclay was shot down and killed, possibly by Leutnant Werner Schroer of III/JG27.

    Barclay is buried in the El Alamein Cemetery and he is commemorated on a plaque in Cromer Parish Church, where his father was vicar from 1939 to 1946.

    Barclay’s elder brother, Lieutenant GC Barclay, died on 5th May 1944 serving with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Norfolk Regiment. He is buried in Kohima War Cemetery, India.

     

    Like

  2. I had to look up the Vought 156 and discovered it was the Vought Vindicator. Wikipedia informed me that « the V-156-F incorporated specific French equipment » and I’m still wondering what that might be. A wine rack? A box for croissants on early morning flights? Hopefully, a machine for making proper coffee!

    Like

    • I had not read everything John. I had not noticed this part…

      On 15 June 1940, the Italian Headquarters ordered the 150o, 18o and 23o Gruppi C.T. to attack the French airfields in Le Cannet des Maures (2km south-east of Le Luc) and Cuers Pierrefeu (close to the naval base of Toulon), in Provence, with the purpose of destroying and disrupting the French fighter force on the ground. 

      Le Cannet des Maures was the base of the GC III/6, which had arrived there on 3 June with its Morane Saulnier MS.406 fighters and was in the midst of converting from that type to the new Dewoitine D.520 (on 15 June 1940 the groupe had at least 13 D.520s on hand). The airfield of Cuers Pierrefeu was the base of the escadrille de chasse AC 3 of the Aéronautique Navale, equipped with eleven Bloch 151 fighters, and the escadrille de bombardement en piqué AB 3 of the Aéronautique Navale, equipped with eleven Vought 156 dive-bombers. 

      Thanks for contributing to my insatiable curiosity.

      Like

    • Found this on the Internet. Someone was building a model of the V 156.

      Link
      http://fighters.forumactif.com/t32579-vough-v156-f-azur-1-72eme-histoire-de

      J’ai acheté cette maquette il y a maintenant quelques années au meeting de la Ferté Alais. Depuis, elle se morfondait dans mon stock. Puis, il y a eu le montage de Tichot, il n’y a pas si longtemps… Du coup, je l’avais amené avec moi à Saint-Brieuc, histoire de la regarder, histoire de m’en donner envie, histoire de…

      J’ai cherché sur le net de la doc qui, sans être abondante, reste cependant suffisante. Mais surtout, je suis tombé sur ceci :

      L’an mil neuf cent quarante, le 23 mai à Gury (Oise), nous, soussignés André Prieur, le Lieutenant Des Détails, Officier de l’Etat-Civil, sur le champ de bataille situé route de Plessier-de-Roye à Canny s / Matz à 1200 mètre du croisement de la route de Lassigny à Gury, en présence du Médecin Lieutenant MARSILLE du 355e RAA, avons constaté le décès d’un mitrailleur carbonisé à son poste sur un avion amphibie (n° du moteur F.16748F-1394F en étoile à 14 cylindres et hélice bipale à pas variable n° MFG-n ° 377996, équipé d’un poste de TSF émetteur OMA VZ 4M Modèle n° 2190 Série 91 établissement Ponsot). Cet avion portait les cocardes françaises et avait sous le fuselage un crochet d’appontage. Sur le corps du mitrailleur, il n’a été trouvé qu’un carnet contenant une liste de quartier-maitres et matelots ainsi que des billets de mille francs portant les n° 447-563-21, un insigne d’observateur de l’aviation maritime et un bouton à ancre de marine, ainsi qu’un morceau de vêtement portant la marque Guerneur-Brest.
      Le corps a été inhumé au cimetière de Gury à l’extrémité de l’allée principale près de la tombe de Gilbert Maupin, décédé le 27 septembre 1916, en présence de l’Abbé Petry Jean, Curé de MARTHILLE (Meuse) et d’un détachement du 40ème Chasseur qui a rendu les honneurs militaires. De tout ce à quoi nous avons dressé le présent procès-verbal qui a été signé par Nous et les témoins après lecture faite.

      J’ai toujours aimé dans l’histoire ces documents qui ramènent à la réalité. Ce procès-verbal est assez impersonnel, il faut en convenir. Pourtant, il relate sans extravagance un fait constaté. Qui était ce mitrailleur ? La question de l’avion est vite résolue, il s’agit bien d’un Vough mais ce marin, que comptait-il faire de ses billets de mille francs ? A quoi pouvait lui servir ce carnet de noms ? Bien sûr, ces questions ne sont guère pertinentes d’un point de vue historique (les n° de série permettraient assez facilement de remontée la filière pour avoir le nom de l’équipage), mais elles rendent, même sans réponses, cet homme proche de nous avec ses inquiétudes, ses peurs, ses préoccupations…Pour le coup, ce document prend une dimension humaine.

      Quand je disais qu’il était aisé de remonter la filière, j’étais sans doute un peu optimiste et peu respectueux de la personne qui a fait cette recherche (Mr Lucien Morareau). Le pilote de cet avion est vraisemblablement l’Enseigne de Vaisseau Gaston Léveillé, né le 14/03/1905 à Saint-Christophe-du-Ligneron (85) et décédé le 22/04/1979 à Challans (85). Breveté observateur le 16/05/1929 (n° 2084) puis pilote le 31/08/1929 (n° 1540) à Hourtin. Il est abattu et blessé le 20/05/1940 à Gury (Oise), son radio, le SM Roger Lafon est tué par les tirs des chasseurs ennemis.

      Pour saisir cette humanité, pour que nous puissions nous dire que cet homme aurait pu vivre à nos côtés mais en d’autres temps, il me faut, sommairement, replanter le décor d’alors…toujours histoire de…

      Après un début de guerre assez inactif, les allemands lancent l’offensive à l’ouest le 10 mai 1940 en attaquant la Hollande et la Belgique. Ils veulent s’approprier un accès à la mer mais surtout attirer loin des Ardennes les forces armées françaises. Ce stratagème réussit. Les meilleurs éléments de l’Armée sont envoyés vers le nord à l’appel des belges submergés. Le 15 mai, les hollandais déposent les armes. Dans le même temps, les divisions allemandes se ruent sur la Meuse. Le 14 mai au soir, elles sont à Sedan. Les trois divisions françaises qui restent se replient vers la ligne Maginot. Ainsi, avec le gros de l’Armée française au nord et l’autre partie, étrillée, repliée à l’est, la route est grande ouverte.

      A peine commencée, la bataille est perdue…

      Le 16 mai, on croît Paris à la merci des allemands qui, contre toute attente infléchissent leur route vers le nord-ouest. L’Armée, envoyée au secours des belges, va tenter de s’opposer et de se frayer un chemin vers le sud mais, abandonnée par les anglais qui ne croient plus en la victoire et les belges qui offrent leur reddition, elle y renonce et se replie vers Dunkerque pour évacuer par la mer avec les anglais. 235 000 anglais et 115 000 français s’échappent en abandonnant le gros de leur matériel.
      Une ligne de défense Somme/Aisne est sommairement organisée avec des troupes déjà résignées. Cette ligne est percée les 6 et 7 juin. Le 10 juin, l’Italie entre en guerre. Le gouvernement quitte Paris pour Bordeaux, c’est l’exode. Paris tombe le 14 juin.

      La défaite est consommée.

      Abordons maintenant le côté Marine Nationale.

      Ce mitrailleur volait sur Vough V156 F. Comme son nom l’indique, il est d’origine américaine (l’avion, pas le mitrailleur !!)…et il fut le premier avion de reconnaissance et de bombardement entièrement métallique de l’US Navy. Monoplan cantilever à ailes repliables, contemporain du Douglas TBD Devastator, il vola pour la première fois en janvier 1936 et entra en service en décembre 1937. Il présentait nombre d’innovations mais le rythme des progrès, à l’époque, le relégua vite au second plan. Il n’était pas exempt de défauts, non plus. Ainsi, sa lenteur, due à un moteur de 825ch, et l’efficacité toute relative de ses ailerons affectaient, par exemple, la précision d’un bombardement en piqué. Les modifications des SB2U-2 et -3 n’améliorèrent pas ces défauts rédhibitoires au combat. Il décollait et grimpait péniblement, sa maniabilité n’était pas bonne…
      Bref, Vough pensa que sa machine aurait peut-être plus de chance à l’exportation. Un démonstrateur fut envoyé en Europe, à Paris, exactement, en octobre 1938. Il s’en suivit une commande portant sur 20 appareils, puis une autre en mai 1939, pour 20 nouvels exemplaires. Les premiers arrivèrent au Havre en juillet 1939, transportés à Orly, remontés et payés… Le 3 septembre, à la déclaration de guerre, 34 machines avaient été livrées. Les derniers avions transitèrent par le Canada pour faire croire que la neutralité américaine était respectée…
      Le V-156-F reçut un certain nombre de modifications pour répondre aux besoins de la Marine française. La manette des gaz fut inversée (pleine puissance dans la position la plus en arrière), l’instrumentation devint métrique, une radio française se substitua à l’américaine et des mitrailleuses Darne de 7,5 mm remplacèrent les mitrailleuses de calibre 30 américaines. On installa, enfin, des accroche-bombes Alkan en remplacement du matériel américain classé « secret ». En Mai 1940, ce dernier équipement n’était toujours pas installé de sorte que les premières missions de combat furent effectuées en utilisant uniquement des bombes sous voilure. La dernière caractéristique des V-156-F fut le montage de freins de piqué (rejeté par l’US Navy).

      L’escadrille AB1 fut la première équipée du nouvel avion, suivie de l’AB3 (les AB2 et AB4 continuèrent à voler sur Loire-Nieuport LN 411). Lorsque le Béarn fut retiré du service, j’y reviendrai, l’AB1 fut basée à Alprecht, près de Boulogne et se cantonna, dans un premier temps, à l’escorte et à la protection des convois transitants dans la Manche et la Mer du Nord.
      Le 20 mai 1940, devant la pénurie des moyens et la rapidité d’action de nos adversaires, l’AB1 est envoyée pour détruire les ponts qui traversent l’Oise, près d’Origny-Sainte-Benoîte et ralentir les forces blindées allemandes. Sans expérience dans l’attaque d’objectifs terrestres, on se demande bien ce que les courageux marins pouvaient réaliser…L’attaque est un fiasco et, sans couverture de chasse, les Vough sont interceptés par des Me 109. 5 appareils vont au tapis…Les survivants participent à la couverture de l’évacuation de Dunkerque au cours de laquelle, ils perdent un nouvel appareil…

      L’AB3 était basée à Cuers et se trouva opposée aux forces italiennes lorsqu’elles nous attaquèrent. Différentes cibles furent bombardées dans le nord de l’Italie et un sous-marin fut revendiqué au large d’Albenga. 6 Vough furent détruits lors du bombardement de la base par les avions italiens. Les survivants évacuèrent vers la Corse…

      Le solde de la commande française fut pris en compte par les britanniques qui désignèrent l’avion sous le nom de Cheasepeake mais ils le reléguèrent rapidement à l’entrainement jusqu’en 1942.

      Les escadrilles de la Marine n’étaient pas entrainées pour lutter contre des blindés et affronter la Flak. Le Vough n’était guère brillant, non plus. Néanmoins, il était plus performant que le Loire-Nieuport qu’il devait remplacer (420 km/h contre 380 !!)

      Pour en terminer avec cette présentation fort longue, trop peut-être, j’ai trouvé des écrits de pilotes de l’AB1, son commandant et un pilote qui ont participé à l’attaque des ponts de l’Oise. Le ton est saisissant…

      Gérard Mesny, à la tête de l’AB1 en 1940 et futur commandant du Lafayette de 1960 à 1961 :
      « la première mission a lieu le 16 mai. Un groupe composé de l’AB1, de l’AB2 et 4, ainsi que des Potez de la 1ère flottille, basée à Calais, attaque un pont en Hollande. Résultats inconnus. Les missions se succèdent à un rythme rapide. Le 17 mai, deux avions ne sont pas rentrés d’une attaque de nuit dans la région de Flessingue. Le 20 mai, les 10 avions restants décollent de jour pour attaquer un pont près d’Origny. Ils doivent être accompagnés par quelques Loire-Nieuport venus de Berk et couverts par une escorte de chasse anglaise (…). Le temps est beau, quelques cumulus, la visibilité est excellente. Les avions emportent chacun deux bombes de 150 kg sous les plans pour le bombardement en piqué. Les Loire, moins rapides, suivent de loin. [Le rendez-vous avec la chasse est manqué mais la mission se poursuit]. A 50 km de Saint-Quentin, des Me 109 nous attaquent et dispersent la formation qui cherche un abri dans les cumulus. (…)5 appareils sont abattus et nous ne pouvons rassembler le reste faute de radio [l’AB1 compte 12 avions]. (…)Je continue sans autre incident jusqu’à l’objectif que je bombarde sans voir le résultat. Le retard des Loire leur permet d’échapper à la chasse allemande et ils bombardent également l’objectif. »

      Cet autre pilote montre dans son rapport à quel point il est impuissant :

      « A la sortie des nuages, (…) j’aperçois au bout d’un certain temps l’objectif, le pont d’Origny que j’attaque en semi piqué. Ensuite, je fais route vers Boulogne et j’oblique vers le sud pour rejoindre les lignes amies. Bien mal m’en a pris. Je suis attaqué par des chasseurs que je n’avais pas vu venir. Mon aileron droit vole en éclat. Je tiens pourtant ma ligne de vol mais je reste très handicapé pour éviter les attaques. [Mon tableau de bord est touché] Je pique à grande vitesse mais les chasseurs ne me lâchent pas. Un coéquipier me prévient qu’un de mes réservoirs est crevé et a pris feu. Sans hésitation, je me présente pour me poser sur le ventre dans une prairie. Je me débrelle et saute à terre mais je suis touché aux bras et aux jambes par un chasseur qui fait une dernière passe mais je me relève. Une camionnette militaire amie vient me ramasser. C’était le 20 mai 1940 vers 18 heures. Je suis évacué à Compiègne où je passe sur le billard. »

      Je voulais terminer cette présentation sommaire et trop longue (mais le sujet mériterait plus sans aucun doute) par un mot ou deux (plutôt deux, d’ailleurs…) sur le porte-avion Béarn.

      La Marine ne s’est que peu souciée de cette arme d’avenir. En 1923, le haut commandement demanda la modification du cuirassée Béarn (commencé en 1920) en porte-avions. Le navire est lancé en 1927. Il embarque 40 avions mais il est rapidement dépassé au sens propre, comme au sens figuré. Le Glorious et le Courageous anglais embarquent 48 avions et filent à 31 nœuds contre 21,5 pour le Béarn… Il est donc relégué à l’entrainement et ses équipages sont débarqués pour affronter les allemands. Le bâtiment est envoyé à Halifax avec une grande réserve d’or pour prendre en charge les avions achetés aux américains. En retour, il embarque 90 avions (des Helldiver, des Curtiss H-75, des Brewster pour les Belges et des Stinson 105). Il arrive aux Antilles le 19 juillet 1940 où il reste immobilisé jusqu’en juin 1943. Il est ensuite envoyé aux Etats-Unis où il est modernisé et sert de transport d’avions (notamment vers l’Indochine après la guerre en 1945-1946) et termine sa carrière à Toulon en 1955. Il faut attendre mars 1957 pour qu’il soit vendu et ferraillé en Italie.

      Foncièrement, que peut-on penser de tout ceci ?
      Le niveau d’impréparation de l’ensemble des forces et des infrastructures françaises est patent. Il ne reste dès lors que le courage des hommes qui lui, aussi, est patent. Ce pauvre mitrailleur, mort dans son avion, avait-il conscience du décalage qui s’était installé entre l’armée allemande et la sienne. Sans doute un peu. Les témoignages ne manquent pas de pilotes qui espèrent bientôt être équipés de matériel américain réputé de meilleure qualité (Curtiss H-75, voire P-40…). Le courage ne suffisait déjà plus et, dans cette optique, je comprends la morosité qui pouvait régner dans les armées. Son sacrifice n’en est que plus exceptionnel. Si ce montage peut lui rendre hommage, ainsi qu’à tous les autres, j’en serai bien heureux, toujours histoire de…
      Philippe

      Like

  3. Pingback: Intermission – My blogs on WordPress | My Forgotten Hobby II

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s